Root of All Suffering – Ten Immoral Actions

November 14, 2017

1. This new subsection of “Dhamma with Less Pāli” is now the second subsection in the “Living Dhamma” section.

  • In the first dēsana of the “Living Dhamma – Overview” subsection, we talked about how one’s mind get agitated when one is engaged in dasa akusala or the ten immoral actions.

2. After that “Living Dhamma – Overview” subsection, I had “Living Dhamma – Fundamentals” as the next subsection, where I started discussing the connection between those dasa akusala and cētasika or mental factors in our thoughts.

  • Now I realize that it was to much of a jump, even for many who have had exposure to Buddha Dhamma but are not familiar with cētasika.
  • So, in this new subsection — “Dhamma with Less Pāli” — I plan to close that gap. This subsection will have much less Pāli words, and I will try to introduce only the essential Pāli words as I proceed.
  1. Here is the first dēsana“Ten Immoral Actions (Dasa Akusala)”. Here we discuss the ten immoral actions (dasa akusala) and how avoiding them helps calm the mind; in fact, this is the key to avoid depression.
Download

 

4. Posts relevant to the dēsanā:

Ten Immoral Actions (Dasa Akusala)

How to Evaluate Weights of Different Kamma

Correct Meaning of Vacī Sankhāra

Truine Brain: How the Mind Rewires the Brain via Meditation/Habits

The Law of Attraction, Habits, Character (Gathi), and Cravings (Asavas)

Habits, Goals, and Character (Gathi)

How Habits are Formed and Broken – A Scientific View

Wrong Views (Micca Ditthi) – A Simpler Analysis

Origin of Morality (and Immorality) in Buddhism

  • In the first dēsana of the “Living Dhamma – Overview” subsection, I talked about how one’s mind get agitated when one is engaged in dasa akusala or the ten immoral actions. Here is that dēsana:

The Hidden Suffering that We All Can Understand

Download

I recommend reading the three posts in that “Living Dhamma – Overview” subsection.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email