Quantum Mechanics – Nonlocality Posts

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Lal 1 year, 2 months ago.

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  • #14569

    Lal
    Keymaster

    Just published the first post on nonlocality:

    Feynman’s Glass Plate Experiment

    Second post on March 29, 2018: Feynman’s Method of “A Particle Exploring All Possible Paths”

  • #14574

    Johnny_Lim
    Participant

    In this post, it is mentioned:

    “When the path difference between those two paths is equal to the wavelength of the light, those two contributions are cancelled out (there is a phase shift of 1800 for the two paths in addition). That is why one sees zero intensity at plate thicknesses that are multiples of even number of half the wavelength.
    On the other hand, when the path difference between those two paths is equal to the half of the wavelength of the light, those two contributions add together.”

    Is this the standing waves of transmission line theory? I studied electromagnetism back in my uni days and it is good to use science to help me gain confidence in Buddha Dhamma.

    We know that light travels at 3×10^8 m/s in vacuum. And if light is made to pass through a medium like glass, it is going to slow down much more. As the light bounces off the first glass surface and gets reflected off as arrow #1, it has to ‘wait’ for its much slower counterpart that is transmitted through the glass that gets reflected on the other side of the glass and emerges as arrow #2 and reunion with arrow #1. But wait a minute, the reflected light taking path #1 doesn’t know the medium which its counterpart is taking and certainly doesn’t know how much slower it is going compared to itself. So how can both meet at the same point? Nature has a way to readjust itself. Regardless of how thick the glass is, as long as it is relatively free from impurities, the above observation will hold true. Hope I understand this post correctly.

  • #14575

    Lal
    Keymaster

    Johnny, It is important to read the following posts carefully (if you are really interested in this particular subject):

    What Is a Wave and What Is a Particle?

    Photons Are Particles Not Waves

    Contrary to what you learned in the old days (as we all did), light is not a wave. Light is a stream of particles called photons. Don’t feel bad. I know some physicists who still think of light as a wave. It is very important to understand the difference between a wave and a wave function, as discussed in the first three posts.

    After reading the above posts carefully, also read #10 of the new post. There I point out that the observation of zero signal with experiments done with large plate thicknesses again disprove light is a wave, for the same reasons that you pointed out (#1 off of the top surface is gone even before #2 coming from the bottom surface gets there; thus destructive interference of “waves” cannot happen).

    P.S. Of course many phenomena involving light can be explained with light treated as an electromagnetic wave, just like the motion of large particles can be treated with Newtonian mechanics.
    But when analyzing quantum phenomena, neither the EM theory nor the Newtonian mechanics work.

  • #14870

    Johnny_Lim
    Participant

    It’s incredible that a simple light path involves such a deep dhamma on how nature works. I doubt my school teachers and uni prof could have known that themselves!

  • #14874

    Lal
    Keymaster

    Yes, Johnny. Quantum mechanics (QM) is actually simple.

    The problem today is that QM has been “overtaken” by mathematics. Most physicists today just use the Schrodinger’s equation and calculate outcomes of experiments. They do not understand the underlying physics. It is like faithfully following a recipe to make a cake; it works. The underlying physics and philosophical issues remain unanswered. This is why QM is treated as “mysterious” today.

    Richard Feynman died in 1988. Most of the key experiments on quantum entanglement (that clearly show the nonlocality of Nature, which is the basis of our new interpretation) were conducted after that and the final confirmation came in 2015. Professor Feynman would have of course made the connection well before 2015 if he was alive. I am amazed that no one has been able to figure it out so far. Even when we submitted the paper, those reviewers could not understand; they apparently do not “get the basics”. The advantage of the website is that I can explain things in more detail here.

    With this section, an undergraduate physics student, or even a good high schooler, should be able to understand QM. One needs to know things like vector addition and the concept of phase angle. If you know anyone who is interested in understanding QM, please ask them to study this section. If they can understand the posts there right now, they should not have problem in understanding the upcoming posts.

    By the way, I came up with this interpretation because I have been thinking about the connection between quantum entanglement and the laws of kamma for a while.

  • #14885

    Johnny_Lim
    Participant

    Hi Lal,

    “By the way, I came up with this interpretation because I have been thinking about the connection between quantum entanglement and the laws of kamma for a while.”

    This led me to think of our kamma becoming instrumental to another person’s vipaka. For example, a person is driving recklessly on the road and a child happens to dash out onto the road to pick up his soccer ball. Tragedy struck. Child died. The aftermath of this ‘accident’ would then give rise to another series of kamma and vipaka. This sort of thing, nature already has a plan. Some people say this is fate. But that sounds deterministic. I prefer to understand it by seeing the fruit of the kamma has ripen for the child. The reckless driver, the child playing near the road unattended, being at the wrong place and wrong time, are conditions to aid in the ripening of the child’s vipaka. With all these conditions in place, nature has planned out this path to undertake. Bar none. The driver did not know beforehand a child was on the road. He was just having fun from his mad rush of adrenalin and did not expect the fun could turn into a tragedy.

    Incidentally, since the earlier discussion talks about light, it arouses my curiosity on how the speed of light defines the current observable universe. Light, albeit fast, is not fast enough to let us see what lies beyond this observable universe. Einstein theorised that time travel is possible if one could travel at speed faster than light. I can’t help but feel that something is not quite right in this theory, or rather not completely understood by Einstein. His work on the theory of relativity is great. But no matter how great, it is still worldly knowledge. There is transcendental knowledge that is not known to Einstein and anyone else other than the Buddha. Could Einstein’s work explain how the Buddha, His great disciples, and the Brahmas, astral-travelled from one place to another in less than the time taken for a strong man to flex his arm? This knowledge just does not lie in our domain of conventional wisdom. Light is simply too slow for Brahma to reach earth. On the other hand, there is this grandfather paradox that debunks the possibility of time travelling back to the past to change events that had already taken place. Also, not forgetting the super events data logger, Namagotta, that is indestructible and unchangeable. So, from the above observations, I infer that time travel is impossible.

  • #14887

    Lal
    Keymaster

    Hi Johnny:
    Yes. Laws of kamma are too complex to be sorted out. We can only see the general trends.

    Johnny said, “ Could Einstein’s work explain how the Buddha, His great disciples, and the Brahmas, astral-travelled from one place to another in less than the time taken for a strong man to flex his arm? This knowledge just does not lie in our domain of conventional wisdom. Light is simply too slow for Brahma to reach earth.”

    1. Gravity and QM work in two separate domains. Gravity takes time (at the speed of light), while QM effects are instantaneous.
    – In other words, if the Sun moves off its track, it will take several minutes for the Earth (us) to feel the effects of that; that is because gravity travel at the speed of light.
    – However, if we have two entangles quantum particles, and if we disturb one on the Earth, the other one will feel that instantaneously even if it is located at the other end of the universe.
    – These are accepted facts by science today.

    2. Dhamma (which include kamma beeja) in the mind plane (in “mananca paticca dhammeca uppadati mano vinnanam”) come instantaneously to our minds. Also, trija kaya of brahmas (and of gandhabbas) is smaller than an electron or a photon and thus obey quantum rules of instantaneous interactions.
    – However, electrons and photons have finite speeds.
    – I cannot discuss details yet, but it is the “instantaneous application of quantum rules” that makes it possible for brahmas and gandhabbas to travel “instantaneously”. So, that is the basic idea.

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