Two unbroken streams of consciousness (DN28)

Welcome! Forums Sutta Interpretations Two unbroken streams of consciousness (DN28)

Viewing 22 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #13581
      sybe07
      Spectator

      From DN28§7 (translation Walshe):

      …”he comes to know the unbroken stream of human consciousness as established both in this world and in the next. That is the third attainment.
      Again, having done this and gone still further, he comes to know the unbroken stream of human consciousness that is not established either in this world or in the next. That is the fourth attainment of vision”.

      According Walse the latest stream refers to the arahants (note 866).

      How do you understand these two streams?

      kind regards
      Siebe

    • #13586
      Lal
      Keymaster

      @Siebe Re: DN28§7

      I cannot locate the location in the sutta where this phrase is at. Could you (1) either post the Pali version of the verse or (2) post the link to the English version so that I can find where it is in the Sutta?

    • #13587
      SengKiat
      Moderator

      @Siebe Re: DN28§7

      He is refering to these two segments :
      https://suttacentral.net/pi/dn28#20
      https://suttacentral.net/pi/dn28#21

      Puna caparaṃ, bhante, idhekacco samaṇo vā brāhmaṇo vā ātappamanvāya … pe … tathārūpaṃ cetosamādhiṃ phusati, yathāsamāhite citte imameva kāyaṃ uddhaṃ pādatalā adho kesamatthakā tacapariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa asucino paccavekkhati: ‘atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā … pe … lasikā muttan’ti. Atikkamma ca purisassa chavi­maṃ­salo­hi­taṃ aṭṭhiṃ paccavekkhati. Purisassa ca viññāṇasotaṃ pajānāti, ubhayato abbocchinnaṃ idha loke patiṭṭhitañca paraloke patiṭṭhitañca. Ayaṃ tatiyā ­dassa­na­samā­patti.

      Puna caparaṃ, bhante, idhekacco samaṇo vā brāhmaṇo vā ātappamanvāya … pe … tathārūpaṃ cetosamādhiṃ phusati, yathāsamāhite citte imameva kāyaṃ uddhaṃ pādatalā adho kesamatthakā tacapariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa asucino paccavekkhati: ‘atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā … pe … lasikā muttan’ti. Atikkamma ca purisassa chavi­maṃ­salo­hi­taṃ aṭṭhiṃ paccavekkhati. Purisassa ca viññāṇasotaṃ pajānāti, ubhayato abbocchinnaṃ idha loke appa­tiṭṭhi­tañca paraloke appa­tiṭṭhi­tañca. Ayaṃ catutthā ­dassa­na­samā­patti. Eta­dā­nuttari­yaṃ, bhante, ­dassa­na­samā­pattīsu.

    • #13589
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Thanks, SengKiat for the quotes.

      However, that section of the sutta is not about an Arahant. It will be good if Siebe can point to the exact location of the verse within the sutta.

    • #13591
      sybe07
      Spectator

      I cannot read Pali. I read the English translation of Walshe. In that those sentences are mentioned in DN28§7. Maybe it is helpful if i post the complete §7? Here is is:

      7. ‘Also unsurpassed is the Blessed Lord’s way of teaching Dharnma in regard to the attainment of in four ways. Here, some ascetic or Brahmin, by means of ardour, endeavour, application, vigilance and due attention, reaches such
      a level of concentration that he considers just this body -upwards from the soles of the feet and downwards from the crown of the head, enclosed by the skin and full of manifold impurities: “In this body there are head-hairs, body-hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, bone-marrow, kidneys,
      heart, liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, mesentery, bowels, stomach, excrement, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, tallow, saliva, snot, synovic fluid, urine.” (as Sutta 22, verse5) That is the first attainment of vision. Again, having done this and gone further, he contemplates the bones covered with skin, flesh and blood. This is the second attainment. Again,having done this and gone further, he comes to know the unbroken stream of human consciousness as established both in this world and in the next.That is the third attainment. Again, having done this and gone still further, he comes to
      know the unbroken stream of human consciousness that is not established either in this world or in the next.866
      That is the fourth attainment of vision. This is the unsurpassed teaching in regard to the attainments of vision.. .

      according note 866 (walshe) this last stream refers to the arahant

      If you read about this stream of consciousnes, according not 865, it refers to vinnana-sota, a rare expression in the sutta’s according Walshe. So if you see vinnana-sota that is probably the location, Lal.

      Siebe

    • #13593
      sybe07
      Spectator

      in the above links provided by SengKiat i can see that vinnanasotam is mentioned in §1.5. Probably that are the lines.

      siebe

    • #13596
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Here is the sutta: Sampasādanīya Sutta (DN 28): In the sutta, after citing various Noble characteristics of the Buddha and Arahants, Ven. Sariputta basically reviews various aspects of the Dhamma, and the particular section that Siebe refers to is the “1.5. Dassanasamāpatti
      desanā” or attaining the first stage of Samma Ditthi (dassana or vision). Therefore, Walshe is wrong is saying that this refers to Arahants.

      Here is the Pali version of the section quoted by Siebe and given above by SengKiat: “Puna caparaṃ, bhante, idhekacco samaṇo vā brāhmaṇo vā ātappamanvāya … pe … tathārūpaṃ cetosamādhiṃ phusati, yathāsamāhite citte imameva kāyaṃ uddhaṃ pādatalā adho kesamatthakā tacapariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa asucino paccavekkhati: ‘atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā … pe … lasikā muttan’ti. Atikkamma ca purisassa chavi¬maṃ¬salo¬hi¬taṃ aṭṭhiṃ paccavekkhati. Purisassa ca viññāṇasotaṃ pajānāti, ubhayato abbocchinnaṃ idha loke appa¬tiṭṭhi¬tañca paraloke appa¬tiṭṭhi¬tañca. Ayaṃ catutthā ¬dassa¬na¬samā¬patti. Eta¬dā-nuttari¬yaṃ, bhante, ¬dassa¬na¬samā¬pattīsu“.

      Basically, this section talks about how a person can see that 32 parts of the body are just composed of satara maha bhuta, and thus have no life in them by themselves, and are subjected to decay and death. One can comprehend this easily with the role of the gandhabba. It is the gandhabba that gives “life” to body parts; when it leaves, the body is lifeless.

      In the third verse, it says, the third vision is attained when one realizes that the vinnana is what keeps the life either in this world or in the netherworld (paralowa as gandhabba). It does not mention gandhabba, but that is the idea.

      In the fourth verse, the fourth vision is to realize that when vinnana ceases to exist, there is no footing either in this world or in paralowa.

      Anyway, it is not possible to translate a verse without realizing the scope of the sutta. Above is just the key idea. This clearly shows that one cannot translate a sutta word-by-word.

      By the way, section 1.3 of the sutta is “1.3 Gabbhavakkanti Desana” or about gandhabba descending to a womb. Gabba is a womb and vakkanti (or okkanti) is entering.

      • #13599
        sybe07
        Spectator

        Thanks Lal, so ‘a stream of consciousness’ is not even mentioned in the text ?

        sorry…but What a mess.

        siebe

    • #13600
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Yes, Siebe, it is a mess. It will take a while for most people to clear the cobwebs and see what the Buddha really meant by some of these verses in suttas.

      Comprehending “Stream of consciousness” is what is meant by “viññāṇasotaṃ pajānāti“. As discussed in the recent posts at the website, viññāṇa is a key concept to understand:
      Viññāna Aggregate

      • #13601
        sybe07
        Spectator

        Hi Lal,

        In the sutta’s the Buddha advises the khandha’s, ofcourse also the vinnanakhandha, to see, with correct wisdom, like this: ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not myself.’ (for example: https://suttacentral.net/en/sn22.17)

        What does this mean? How to understand this?

        Do you belief the Buddha did possess some kind of knowledge (wisdom) of which he really was, some kind of true identity-view, from which he really knew…i am not the khandha’s nor are they mine and myself?

        Or, do you belief that the instruction ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not myself’, is only a skillful means, not meant as an expression of truth, just an instruction which is helpfull to detach?

        kind regards,
        Siebe

    • #13606
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Siebe said: “Do you belief the Buddha did possess some kind of knowledge (wisdom)…”

      Of course I do. The whole idea is that a Buddha is a human who has perfected mind capabilities to the ultimate level, and is able to comprehend everything about the world. The problem most people have is they think the Buddha is yet another guru or a top level philosopher. One of course starts there, since one does not want have blind faith.

      You may know the name of the sutta, where someone asked the Buddha “Are you a human, a deva, or a brahma?”. The Buddha said he was none of those. That he had transcended all in the 31 realms.

      I think there is enough material at the website, especially with the “Nāma & Rūpa to Nāmarūpa” subsection, to see that the Buddha is someone who truly transcended this world.

      The material I have presented so far is just scratching the surface. I myself have to spend the rest of my life to write what I know right now (and I do get frustrated about that). What I know came mainly from my later teacher Waharaka Thero’s desanas, but I am learning more from the Tipitaka now. The Buddha said that what he has taught can be compared to a handful of leaves in a forest. So, one will never be able to comprehend even a fraction of what he knew.
      Also see: “Buddha Dhamma: Non-Perceivability and Self-Consistency“.

      Siebe said: “In the sutta’s the Buddha advises the khandha’s, ofcourse also the vinnanakhandha, to see, with correct wisdom, like this: ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not myself.’
      What does this mean? How to understand this?”

      That is a good question, and most of the website is focused on explaining this subtle point. This is really about sakkaya ditthi: whether there is anything in this world to be worthwhile to be called “mine” and to do immoral things to maintain those “things”.

      The Buddha rejected both “no-self” and an “everlasting self”. We cannot say “I don’t exist” or “you don’t really exist”. We both know that we do exist. But, this existence is transient. There is nothing to brag about even if one is a king, deva, or a brahma.

      In this existence, we are humans. But in the next, we could an animal, a deva, or brahma. And that depends on what we have done in the past, and more importantly, what we are doing in this life (because we can get out of this suffering-filled existence by learning and practicing Dhamma).

      In fact, at a deeper level, all five aggregates arise due to six causes (lobha, dosa, moha, alobha, adosa, amoha). But we only need to get rid of lobha, dosa, moha to break this samasaric journey. And that is done by staying away from dasa akusala, and learning and comprehending Tilakkhana. Panna (wisdom) will grow and all six roots will be taken out.

      Now, this idea can be understood (and expressed) by different people in different ways. So, I would encourage others to give their opinions.

    • #13612
      sybe07
      Spectator

      Thanks Lal.

      I notice that i still stumble on that sentence “in this existence, we are humans”.

      I know it is not described that way in the sutta’s, but i belief the view “i am a human’ is a sakkaya ditthi. It is a view related to the five khandha’s, for example…i am a human… because i have a human-specific body or .. i am a human… because i have human-specific mental formations or perceptions. All those views relating to khandha’s seem to be sakkaya ditthi. That’s why i belief ‘i am a human’ can be seen as a sakkaya ditthi.

      Siebe

    • #13613
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Siebe said: “I know it is not described that way in the sutta’s, but i belief the view “i am a human’ is a sakkaya ditthi”.

      I did not say, “i am a human’ is a sakkaya ditthi”. Please read the above carefully.

      What I said was: “This is really about sakkaya ditthi: whether there is anything in this world to be worthwhile to be called “mine” and to do immoral things to maintain those “things”.”
      This is a fine point to grasp.

    • #13616
      sybe07
      Spectator

      Lal, in the above post you express- at least that’s how i read it- sakkaya ditthi is about values (is there anything worthwile to be called ‘mine’etc. )

      My impression from reading the sutta’s: sakkaya ditthi does not deal with values. It deals with really seeing that all those identity-views which control in daily life our thoughts, emotions, deeds, are really, as it actually is, wrong identity-views.

      Siebe

    • #13617
      Akvan
      Participant

      Hi Siebe,

      You asked what the meaning of the phrase ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self’ is.
      I see that you have raised this in another post as well. I will try and explain what I understand of this.

      Preceding the above phrase (for example in https://suttacentral.net/en/sn22.15) the Buddha says “Bhikkhus, form is impermanent. What is impermanent is suffering. What is suffering is nonself.” In Pali this is “Rūpaṃ, bhikkhave, aniccaṃ. Yadaniccaṃ taṃ dukkhaṃ; yaṃ dukkhaṃ tadanattā”

      I understand this as; rupa will not stay the way one likes it to be. If something does not stay the way I like it to be it causes suffering. And if something causes suffering then there is no point in it (it is worthless/pointless).

      Then he goes on to say: “What is nonself should be seen as it really is with correct wisdom thus: ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self.’” In pali “yadanattā taṃ ‘netaṃ mama, nesohamasmi, na meso attā’ti”

      I understand this as; If something is pointless / worthless (as it causes suffering), there is no point (it is foolish) to think of it is me, it is mine and something worthwhile to try and make it mine.

      Makes sense??

      It is also said that fully understanding of the above leads one to become an arahath and that this is the only thing that needs to be done to attain nibbana. So I don’t think that the phrase; ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self.’ (yadanattā taṃ ‘netaṃ mama, nesohamasmi, na meso attā’ti) specifically refers to sakkayaditti. However, the basic / fundamental understanding of this will lead to the eradication of sakkayaditti. I guess at the ultimate level, the understanding of this leads to the eradication of Maana (asameemana).

      • #13620
        Johnny_Lim
        Participant

        Hi Akvan,

        I recalled there was an arrogant Nigantha who challenged the Buddha to a debate. The Buddha taught that the 5 khandhas are annica whereas the Nigantha said otherwise. The Buddha further elaborated His point by asking the Nigantha whether the great kings have sovereign control over the lives of their country folks. The Nigantha said yes. Then, the Buddha returned back to questioning the Nigantha whether he has any sovereign control over his 5 khandhas. The Nigantha went silent and defeated. In the end, he had no choice but to admit that he was wrong. Otherwise, by remaining silent he would risk splitting his head into 7 pieces.

        I agree with you that it is worthless and meaningless to cling on to the view that we are in control of everything, especially something like the 5 khandhas which are so close and personal to us, which often trick us into believing that they defined our self with it’s illusory and enigmatic nature. But on the other hand, we also cannot say the 5 khandhas are not ours. Thoughts, views, feelings…etc are clearly residing within our own domain and not in another person.

    • #13618
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Akvan said: “So I don’t think that the phrase; ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self.’ (yadanattā taṃ ‘netaṃ mama, nesohamasmi, na meso attā’ti) specifically refers to sakkayaditti. However, the basic / fundamental understanding of this will lead to the eradication of sakkayaditti. I guess at the ultimate level, the understanding of this leads to the eradication of Maana (asameemana).”

      I agree. The vision or understanding starts at the Sotapanna Anugami stage, but it is truly comprehended only at the Arahant stage.
      Also see: “Sakkaya Ditthi is Personality (Me) View?“.

    • #13621
      Johnny_Lim
      Participant

      ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self’

      I had just contemplated over this statement during lunch break. I imagined myself having abhinna power to look back at my past lives, just like sitting in front of my smart TV searching for an interesting tv program to watch. I randomly clicked on one and started watching. In this video, there is a family man married to a beautiful lady and having beautiful looking children. The story is talking about the life of this family man and the people around him. After a while I got bored of this video and I switched to another tv program – Documentary on animals. Such and such animal was hot on pursuit and such and such animal is falling prey to another animal and so on. Suddenly, I recalled that I am not just watching videos. I am watching my past lives! We all know that when watching movies, we do not really associate ourselves with the actors and actresses inside the movies (there are some people who do though). So, be it a tragic ending or a happy ending, we know it as just a movie. I think the statement ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self’ is conveying this idea. Why are we not getting emotional and personal when watching movies and documentary? Because we know we are not involved in them. But don’t forget, the videos I just ‘watched’ some moments ago involved ‘me’ deep in my past life. And yet I view them as though I’m watching tv program. This very life, after it has ended, will also become one of these videos. A future ‘me’ with developed abhinna power would also be able to stream this video to watch. The future ‘me’ would have long forgotten about the good times and bad times I had in this life, and would not even be concerned about them at all.

      Whatever sankhara we had done in the past and are still doing today, we should depersonalize them. But we ought to do it with the right understanding of kamma.

    • #13631
      sybe07
      Spectator

      Thanks for your answers. I have no comment. I just wanna share the way it lives for me:

      When in mediation thoughts (inner dialoque) can end, then i do surely not end, right? So, it is really true that i am not these thoughts. If during meditation all mental defilements end, (temporary) i surely do not end. So, as it actually is, i am not those mental defilements. If during meditation all gross volitional activity would end, such as plans and intentions, tendencies, i surely do not end. etc.

      So how far can this proces of cessation go on? When do i dissappear? Does there come any moment?

      In my opinion the Buddha discovered that mind can, in this very life, become completely free of whatever it normally perceives or experieces, such as thoughts, feelings, perceptions, mental formations and consciousness (seeing, hearing, smelling, sensing a body etc) and stil one does not end. One is not death, nor unconscious. It can all end and still we (mind) does not end.

      So, i belief that’s why the Buddha teaches that, as it actually is, that we are not the khandha’s. It is not who we are, not our real self.

      Oke, our daily self-views are based upon those khandha’s, sakkaya ditthi, but this is a wrong perception ourself. But it is a strong habit to belief things like ‘ i am the body, or ‘i am those plans’ or ‘those intentions or feeling are mine’ etc. The sutta’s describe such views as sakkaya ditthi.

      So, i belief we can actually get the understanding that we are not the khandha’s, by experience.

      Then one knows for sure: i do not need those to exist. Those are just mirror-images, not me, not mine, nor myself.

      The key is…in daily life we are protection a false identity. And our daily habit to safeguard ourself is also based on that false identity-view.

      A sotapanna feels safe, because he/she has seen her/his true face. No agression is needed anymore to safeguard oneself, no greed, no identification. One lets go. One does not face other people anymore in a certain identity-role. One has lost all defence. Siebe does not meet other people anymore as Siebe. Empty of self-views he/she is not defensive anymore.

      This whole psychological proces of safeguarding oneself vanishes gradually. An arahant has eliminated it.

      Breath-mediation is about calming mind en body which facilitates cessation and letting go. To experience cessation one has to be brave and wise. Brave because one looses known structures, one looses grip and mind does not like that.

      I feel this is the real challenge we have to deal with. This cannot be learned from books. Gradually we have to become more and more brave and wise in letting go.

      Siebe

    • #13639
      Johnny_Lim
      Participant

      From SN 12.37

      https://suttacentral.net/en/sn12.37

      “At Savatthī. “Bhikkhus, this body is not yours, nor does it belong to others. It is old kamma, to be seen as generated and fashioned by volition, as something to be felt.”

    • #13643
      C. Saket
      Participant

      A heartfelt greetings to everyone !

      Just to comment on the matter of Sakkaya ditthi.
      I agree with Ven. Lal Sir’s point of view.
      In current English versions Sakkkaya ditthi is translated as “personality view“, “identity view“, “self view“, etc. which is NOT CORRECT.

      The correct meaning of Sakkaya ditthi has been aptly described by Ven. Lal Sir in his post:
      Is Sakkaya ditthi a personality (me) view ?

      If anyone wants to read more about this then please visit here:
      https://discourse.suttacentral.net/t/entering-samma-di-hi/5701

      Hope this helps
      MAY ALL BEINGS ATTAIN NIBBANA !!!

    • #13651
      sybe07
      Spectator

      Sakkaya ditthi is very practical.

      See, for example, how certain people fully identify with a youthful face. They cannot bear the fact it is getting older. They want it to stay the same. Why? Because they hold on to this identity-view: ‘i am that (a) youthful face’.

      Or, think about identification with health. This is dramatic too. I have this to much. One cannot bear becoming ill and bear decreasing abilities when
      one identifies with health and youth. One may even loose all self-respect because one lives with the identity-view…’i am healthy, health is mine’.

      One can also identify with race, profession, sex, religion, etc. ‘I am a buddhist’, this is sakkaya ditthi.

      If you think you are a very learned man (sakkaya dithhi) and someone treats you as a normal human being…oh…anger will arise.

      Still more furious you will become when you think ‘ i am wise’ and another person does not give you the respect.

      Or think about someone who thinks…’those (bad) habits (being cruel or unfriendly) are mine, they are who i am’..(very common) …how would such a person let go of such bad habits?

      One can see how sakkaya ditthi is, as it were, the tendency to freeze reality, to solidify reality by creating certain self-views and to hold them to be truthful. To hold them for who you really are.

      Sakkaya ditthi does not refer to full aware operating identity views but often thoses views operate unaware and habitually. The moment one stand for a mirror they immediately operate and delude the mind with ideas like: ‘i am that body’, or ‘that body is mine’. The moment you walk in the office you are changing. An identity-view takes over. The moment i meet my neighbour i myself become ‘a neighbour’. The moment i see a nice woman i change. I step in an identity-view, or better, sakkaya ditthi takes me.

      Sakkaya ditthi is like stepping into a dream-state. Stepping into a movie-like life, with you yourself as actor.

      Johnny_Lim says:
      “But on the other hand, we also cannot say the 5 khandhas are not ours. Thoughts, views, feelings…etc are clearly residing within our own domain and not in another person”.

      To belief the body is mine, i first have to belief there is an I apart from the body. To belief feelings are mine, i first have to belief there is an I apart from feelings etc. The Buddha says there isn’t such an seperate entity-I. There is no car apart from it wheels, chassis etc. There is no I apart from the khandha’s. So, when there is no I there can be a possessor of a body, feeling etc.

      An arahant seems to know this for sure.

      Siebe

    • #13653
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Here is another way to look at this issue.

      Siebe said: “There is no car apart from it wheels, chassis etc.”

      This simile of Ven. Nagasena can only provide a crude analogy. A human is more than just physical body parts.

      One key idea missing in the above analogy is that while a car has no gathi, a human does. These five khandhas are deeply related to each other. For example, our physical body in this life is pretty much compatible with our four other khandhas, unlike the parts of a car.

      If we cultivate deva sankhara by engaging in meritorious deeds, speaking accordingly, and thinking accordingly, our four mental aggregates will slowly change in that direction. If, at the end of this human bhava, we have turned our gathi to that of a deva, then the next birth is likely to be a deva. Then our body will be drastically changed to that of a deva.

      If one cultivates sankhara appropriate for a dog, then the next bhava is likely to lead to be a “dog bhava” with a body of a dog, and thoughts of a dog, etc.

      Deva gathi” will yield a deva and a “dog gathi” will yield a dog. No matter what gathi we cultivate, the existence that we get is only temporary. We do not know what will happen in future existences (bhava). We need to try to at least get to the Sotapanna stage in this life, to get out of this recurring process.

      We are not just our body parts, but our gathi play a key role. While our gathi are is constant flux, they are always there in some form to keep us bound in this rebirth process.

      The only way to get rid of the five khandhas is to remove ALL gathi or defilements (dasa akusala, dasa samyojana). This needs to be done in steps though.

      First, we need to understand the importance of the worst of the dasa akusala: killing, stealing, too much attachment to sensual pleasures (which includes sexual misconduct), then those done by speech.

      Then we need to take steps clean up our vaci sankhara (conscious thoughts) to be compatible with the above.

      However, the “apayagami gathi” cannot ever be PERMANENTLY removed until one starts comprehending “anicca, dukkha, anatta“. That is the next step.

      To be at least be feed from the apayas, we need to get rid of “apayagami gathi”. That cannot be done without comprehending Tilakkhana.

      That is the special message of the Buddha. That has to be learned from the Tipitaka. No one can do that on one’s own, no matter how intelligent one is. So, when Siebe says: “This cannot be learned from books”, that is not correct.

      This is because while we can live with a peace of mind by living a moral life, or become a deva or a brahma or a human in the next life by cultivating appropriate sankhara, we have no control of what may happen in the future lives.

      If we get born into a “bad environment” and start cultivating sankhara of an animal or even a “hell being” by joining a gang of killers, then the next birth could in an apaya. In fact, any living being existing right now has been through all those realms in the past. This is the hardest point to understand for most people.

    • #13673
      sybe07
      Spectator

      For myself i have seen sakkaya ditthi is indeed the first main imperfection to be removed on the Path (Patisambhidamagga, Treatise on Knowledge, §355-358, Nanamoli).

      I belief, sakkaya ditthi refers to attachment due to (wrong) identity view.

      The mind becomes attached to the perception of a gross body, to feelings, to other perceptions, to mental formations and things like seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, touching due to the deeply ingrained (unaware operating) habit to see/view (and therefor experience) those phenomena as ‘who i am’, or as ‘mine’.

      In short: mind gets attached through the proces of mine-making and full identifation with what is being experienced. The moment the body, for example, is seen (and therefor experienced) as ‘mine’ an identity view is created. This is true for all the khandha’s. Full identification with the khandha’s or seeing them as ‘mine’, is indeed the formation of an identity view.

      That’s why the Buddha says: “this is not mine, not who i am, not myself’, refering to the khandha’s. To counteract this deeply ingrained habit of sakkaya ditthi, of grasping those khandha’s as ‘mine’ or ‘who i am.

      This is attachment due to viewing. Forming such identity views is a habit.
      One does not do this consciously or deliberatly but it is going for many many lives.

      As long as there is the habit to see (and therefor experience) this body, these feelings, these perceptions, these mental formations and consciousnesses as ‘who i am’ or as ‘mine’, mind is hooked to it due to viewing. There cannot be any stress-release this way.

      I do not agree stress-release comes with staying away from dasa akusala. That is not my own experience. As long as there is sakkaya ditthi, and one identifies with khandha’s or views them as ‘mine’, there is stress, fire like you see in your post Lal.

      So it all begins here, with removing sakkaya ditthi, with this deeply ingrained habit of seeing/viewing those khandha’s as mine or as who i am. Sakkaya ditthi refers also to other self-views but i belief these are the most common.

      My own experience is that one starts to see sakkaya ditthi actually operating when one experiences during meditation certains cessations, such as the cessation of thoughts, of volitional activity, or maybe, for example, the cessation of the perception of a gross physical body or breath.

      While one experiences such things one can see sakkaya ditthi. For example, one is used to experience a gross phyiscal body and when this perception ends, fear arises. This is because one for many many lives has lived with the idea…”i am this perception of a gross body’. So one feels like one looses control. One experiences it like oneself is gone when the perception of a gross body is gone! As if one looses oneself!

      This is exactly the effect of sakkaya ditthi.

      With sakkaya ditthi it is not possible to attain Nibbana. Why? Because one cannot let go. One is afraid to let go, because one is identified with certain experiences such as feelings, certain perceptions, mental formations, consciousness etc. Therefor mind reacts with fear on cessation.

      Siebe

    • #13674
      sybe07
      Spectator

      sorry…i said…”fire like you see in your post Lal”…this must be….”fire as you say in your post Lal.

      You often refer to this fire.

      siebe

    • #13676
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Siebe said: “I do not agree stress-release comes with staying away from dasa akusala.”

      This is getting to be a philosophical discussion. This forum is not a platform for philosophy, where people just go back and forth trying to push their views.

      I am not trying to persuade anyone of anything. Just explaining what the Buddha taught according to the Tipitaka. I would be happy to discuss any incompatibilities that exist within the website or with the Tipitaka.

      I have tried to explain over and over that Buddha Dhamma is based on getting away from dasa akusala. You don’t need to accept that, but then this website or the forum will not be any use for you and discussions like this will not be useful to others either.

      Trying to understand Buddha’s message without realizing the consequences of dasa akusala, is like trying to learn multiplication without learning addition. I am getting tired of saying this over and over.

      I am closing this topic. Please be considerate to others, and keep this in mind if you have other questions and want to open a new topic on a different subject.

Viewing 22 reply threads
  • The topic ‘Two unbroken streams of consciousness (DN28)’ is closed to new replies.