Quantum Mechanics and Consciousness

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    • #14685
      Lal
      Keymaster
    • #26636
      interested
      Participant

      Stupid question but> subject of rebirth and the concept of mind being separate to the body, is intriguing. All things being connected to a certain extent via entanglement maybe.

      If mind allows all things to happen, under Buddhist teachings can mind be viewed as the universe as a whole, with the brain/body acting on inputs like an automaton, as a small part of a universe.

      That feeling in the chest mentioned on one of the pages when something is going to happen, rings bells.

    • #26637
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Hello, interested!

      The mind does not exist just by itself. There must be at least a trace of matter for the mind to exist.

      That is a critical point in Buddha Dhamma that many people do not realize. The “seat of the mind” is called “hadaya vatthu.” It is unbelievably small and is created by kammic energy when a living being grasps a new existence.
      – In addition to hadaya vatthu, up to five “pasāda rupa” are created by the kammic energy at that time.

      That package, hadaya vatthu together with the set of pasāda rupa is the fundamental “unit of existence”. It is called the “manōmaya kāya” because the energy for the creation of it comes from the kammic energy when a strong kamma is committed.

      I cannot get into details but wanted to provide the basis. A good point to start is to go through the posts in the new section, “Origin of Life.”
      – If you are serious about finding the answers, it is necessary to read that section. This is not something that can be explained in a page or two.
      – You can ask further questions AFTER reading that series. Please refer to any post in question and the particular bullet numbers.

      P.S. One more key point to make the connection to Quantum Mechanics.

      That manōmaya kāya (and the kammic energy or dhammā that creates it) is in the “quantum realm.” Just like electrons and photons that are in the quantum realms are entangled, they are entangled too. That is how life forms are connected across space.
      – That is also called “non-locality.” Recent experiments have confirmed that our world is indeed non-local. See, “Quantum Mechanics – A New Interpretation.”

    • #27352
      Johnny_Lim
      Participant

      Something came to mind. If I understand correctly, even citta is quantized. So, can I safely assume that there is nothing in this world that is truly analog in nature? What appears to be analog is due to our brain being the bottleneck in information processing. Unless there is something out there that is at least the speed of a citta rising and passing away, we can never know for sure the existence of such analog nature. For instance, an audio signal. What appears to be a continuous audio sound wave is only as analog as our citta arising and passing away speed.

    • #27353
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Good observation, Johnny!

      ” If I understand correctly, even citta is quantized. So, can I safely assume that there is nothing in this world that is truly analog in nature?”

      Not only citta, but “matter” is quantized too. The smallest unit of matter is a suddhāṭṭhaka. See, “The Origin of Matter – Suddhāṭṭhaka.”

      We can safely say that the Buddha was the first scientist to point out the “quantum nature.”

    • #27354
      Johnny_Lim
      Participant

      Hi Lal,

      I have an impression that when something is quantized, it tends to have a fleeting nature. Not sure whether my understanding is correct. So, when you mention “matter” is also quantized, how should it be understood? Particularly physical objects around us.

      Thanks.

    • #27355
      Lal
      Keymaster

      Hi Johnny,
      You said, “I have an impression that when something is quantized, it tends to have a fleeting nature.”

      The part about “fleeting nature” is a misinterpretation. I see that all the time.

      For example, a suddhāṭṭhaka (created by the javana power) can last billions of years, until destroyed at the end of a Maha Kappa (i.e., when the Solar system is destroyed.)

      The main idea that the Buddha tried to teach was that anything “material” changes even momentarily (but that “momentary change” can be very small.) For example, our bodies undergo momentary changes, but we can see “significant changes” only over the years.
      – Furthermore, things can change unexpectedly over time. That is the “viparinama nature.”

      Of course, our thoughts (citta) change very rapidly. It is appropriate to say that thoughts have a “fleeting nature.”

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