Difference Between a Buddha and an Arahant

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    • #26889
      Lal
      Keymaster

      This post is from Lvalio.
      – Apparently, he was unable to post it. He says he keeps getting the following message:
      *** Forbidden. Dangerous network. ***

      A couple of others have mentioned this problem too. But some are able to make postings later on.
      – The software problem is still persisting. The software team (bbPress) says that the next version should fix these issues. However, they have not said when that would be.
      – Please email me any comments that anyone does not get to post.
      P.S. I may not be able to respond for a day. I am working on the new post. Hopefully, others will be able to provide some insights.

      Here is the question by Lvalio:

      Is the Enlightenment of the Buddha the same as an Arahant?

      In the SBB forum (Buddhist society of Brazil), I explained to a question about what a Buddha really was.

      But two followers of the Ajahn of Thailand’s forest responded that I was wrong and that this concept of taking many lives for someone to become a Buddha was outdated and basically a Buddha could get enlightenment through following the Noble Way octuple…

      I didn’t quite understand until I found this article by Bhikkhu Analayo:

      The Scope of Free Inquiry According to the Vīmaṃsakasutta and its Madhyamaāgama Parallel* (Anālayo)

      In it, he says that by studying the Chinese Sutta (or sutra) to compare with the pali guy, he was delighted to discover that the Chinese put the Buddha and the Arahants on an equal footing??!!

      What do you think?

    • #26909
      Lal
      Keymaster

      I have a little bit of time and thought of writing a few things to consider.

      1. There are three ways to attain Nibbāna:

      – A Sammā Sambuddha (like Buddha Gōtama) discovers the Noble Eightfold Path and achieves Nibbāna through his efforts, AND he can teach the doctrine to others.
      – A second way to attain Nibbāna is to learn Dhamma from a Sammā Sambuddha or a true disciple of his. That is how an Arahant reaches nibbāna.
      – Then a paccēka Buddha discovers the Path by himself but is not capable of explaining the path (Dhamma) to other people.

      2. In all three cases, the same Nibbana (Enlightenment) is attained. That basically means stopping the suffering-filled rebirth process.
      – However, a Sammā Sambuddha is a very special person. Without a Sammā Sambuddha, no one else (other than a paccēka Buddha) will be able to attain Nibbana.

      3. I have not had time to read the article of Bhikkhu Analayo quoted by Lvalio.
      – However, as I understand, Bhikkhu Analayo does not firmly believe in rebirth. He seems to be one of those “secular Buddhists” that I have discussed in the following post: “Buddhism without Rebirth and Nibbāna?.”

      Finally regarding the following statement in Lavalio’s post: “But two followers of the Ajahn of Thailand’s forest responded that I was wrong and that this concept of taking many lives for someone to become a Buddha was outdated and basically a Buddha could get enlightenment through following the Noble Way octuple…“, I recommend the following post:
      Pāramitā and Niyata Vivarana – Myths or Realities?
      – Yes. It takes an enormous effort, through an enormous number of lives, to become a Buddha.
      – A Buddha is indeed a VERY SPECIAL human. In fact, he is the ultimate scientist, since he discovers ALL ABOUT the wider world of 31 realms, AND how to escape from it.
      – One cannot really appreciate the value of a Buddha until one starts comprehending that “wider world view.”

      The sentence that I have highlighted shows the ignorance of whoever said that. No one can KNOW about the Eightfold Noble Path without a Buddha DISCOVERING it! A Buddha discovers that on his own.

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